Is it a Good Time to Change Careers?

With the pandemic starting to wind down and many of us going back to work, you may be asking yourself, “Is now a good time to change careers?” You have to ask yourself whether you want to go back to your old job (if it is even still available), or if you want to start a new career? Even after the pandemic ends, over 85 million jobs will be lost to automation by the year 2025, according to Forbes. From factory workers and retail, to food service as well as many other industries, we will see a rise in automation, and many people will need to reinvent their careers. So, the answer to “Is it a good time to change careers?” is an overwhelming “Yes!”

So, what is a good career to change to? There is a growing need for Medical Assistants, Medical Office Assistants and Dental Assistants. While many other industries are automating and technology is making some workers obsolete, there is still a great demand for Medical, Medical Office and Dental Assistants. Jobs that can only be done in person and by a human will still be in demand. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the projected growth of Medical Assistants is 19 percent in the next decade. Medical Office Assistants and Dental Assistants are also on a growth trend over the next decade(U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics). So, what you really have to ask yourself is, “If not now, when?”

Why Attend a Vocational School?

A good way to start a new career is to attend a vocational school. You can change careers in as little as 9 months rather than years and move into a growing profession in Dental and Medical Assisting. These are only some of the benefits of attending a vocational school:

A Quick Change

Did you know that you can become a Medical Assistant or Dental Assistant in as little as 9 months? Or a Medical Office Assistant in as little as 6 months? A vocational school’s curriculum focuses only on what you need to start your new career. Just the classes that will teach you how to perform as a Medical Assistant, Medical Office Assistant or Dental Assistant. Vocational schools help you change your career to an in-demand industry.

Industry-Experienced Instructors

It can be difficult changing careers, but at a vocational school you will have industry experienced instructors helping you every step of the way. Our instructors have been working in the medical and dental industries for many years and were once where you are now. These instructors know what employers are looking for and are dedicated to helping you prepare for your new career. They are available for any questions you may have and offer one-on-one attention as needed.

Hands-on Experience

The best part about a vocational school program is all the hands-on experience you will get from lab work and an externship. After learning the theory behind Medical and Dental Assisting, you complete hands-on procedures to reinforce the knowledge that you have gained. Repetition is key to muscle memory, and you will spend a portion of your time getting hands-on experience in the Medical and Dental fields. At the end of the coursework, you will complete an externship, closely supervised by a medical or dental professional. This experience will look great on your resume when you start looking for your first job after graduation.

Career Services

You won’t be alone, when looking for a new job after graduation. Our career services advisors will help you network with community practices to find the right match for you. They will help you with resume building, mock interviews and job fairs, so that you present yourself in the very best light when you start your job hunt. Although we can’t guarantee a job after graduation, we will do our best to assist you in your job searching efforts.

Final Thoughts

Changing careers can be a stressful decision. You want to make sure you are making the best decision for your future. PCI Health Training Center understands this and helps you every step of the way from applying to school all the way through to graduation and assisting you in finding a new job. Take the first step and secure your future with a new career with the help of PCI Health Training Center.

Want to Learn More?

Think it is a good time to change careers?  If you are interested in learning how you can start a new career by attending PCI Health Training Center, contact us for more information on how to start a rewarding career today.

Medical Assistant Program

The Medical Assistant Program prepares you to work as an entry-level medical assistant. Within this general career category there are several specialty areas, including medical administrative office assistant, clinic assistant, clinic tech, medical office manager, phlebotomist and physical therapy aide in a doctor’s office, clinic or hospital out-patient clinic.

Medical Office Assistant Program

The Medical Office Assistant Program is designed to prepare you to work as an entry-level medical front office assistant, receptionist, insurance biller, insurance collector, appointment scheduler, medical secretary, or medical records clerk in health care centers, clinics, hospitals, ambulatory care centers and medical billing offices.

Dental Assistant Program

The Dental Assistant Program prepares you to work as an entry-level dental assistant, dental receptionist, office manager or dental hygienist assistant in a dental office, specialty practice, or dental clinic.

**PCI firmly upholds its policy of nondiscrimination. Inquiries regarding policy may be directed to TitleIXCoordinator@pcihealth.com.

For more information about our graduation rates and other important information, please visit our website at www.pcihealth.edu/consumer-information. The Dental Assistant Program is offered at our Richardson Campus.

What is the Difference Between a 4-Year College and Vocational School?

Are you considering attending college? Want to know the difference between a 4-year college and vocational school? The major difference is in the name. Do you have 4-years to attend college? Before answering that question, consider why you are going to college in the first place.

Why Does Someone Go to College?

There are many different reasons for you to attend college. From getting a job to supporting a family and everything in between. In today’s competitive job market, a diploma or degree will give you a leg up on your competition.

Get a Job After Graduation

The main reason someone goes to college is to better their chances of getting a job after graduation. Whether you have a family or live alone, you still have many different expenses you must pay. From rent and food to utilities and of course the occasional night out. The cost of living is increasing, and a high school diploma may not be enough to get a job that helps keep your head above water.

Learn Something New

Another reason that people go to college is to learn something they are passionate about. While some people are unsure what they want to do, eventually everyone finds a program that best fits their interests. From business and literature to medical and pre-law. College gives you many different options to choose from and the ability to learn something new along the way.

Support a Family

Some of us have a family to take care of and going to college is a great way to get out of a boring job and into a life-long career. Whether you are taking care of an elderly parent or raising children, the cost of supporting a family can be expensive. College is a way of increasing your earning potential, giving you a better ability to take care of your family’s needs.

What is the Difference Between a 4-Year College and Vocational School?

There are many differences between a 4-year college and vocational school. These are something you should consider when you are choosing which college to attend. Do you have 4 years to attend college? Do you want to take 2 years of elective or general education courses? These are some of the questions you must answer, to understand which secondary education is right for you.

Graduate in as Little as 9 Months Rather than Years

The biggest difference between a traditional college and vocational school is that you can graduate in as little as 9 months rather than years at a vocational school. How did you answer the question of whether you have 4 years to attend college? At most vocational schools, you will graduate in less than a year, attending full-time. PCI Health in particular offers both Medical and Dental Assisting programs that can be completed in as little as 9 months, with Medical Office Assisting taking as little as 6 months from start to finish. Gain the knowledge and skills you need to enter the Medical Field!

Final Thoughts

Do you want to graduate in as little as 9 months with a life-long career in the Medical or Dental industries, helping others in the process? If you answered yes, then it may be time to learn more about PCI Health Training Center and our Medical, Medical Office and Dental Assisting programs. You can learn a vocation, start working in as little as 9 months rather than years and take that first step toward a new career. The first step of any journey is always the most important, so take that first step today and start a new career tomorrow.

Did learning about a vocational school interest you? PCI Health Training Center offers programs in medical assisting, dental assisting and medical office assisting. We are a private vocational college committed to preparing students for the Healthcare industry. PCI provides hands-on training and school externships that provide real-world experience and prepare you for the first day at your new career. Contact PCI Health Training Center for more information on how to start a rewarding career today.

 

**PCI firmly upholds its policy of nondiscrimination. Inquiries regarding policy may be directed to TitleIXCoordinator@pcihealth.com.

For more information about our graduation rates and other important information, please visit our website at www.pcihealth.edu/consumer-information. 

How Long Does It Take to Become a Medical Office Assistant?

While nursing or medical assisting often comes to mind when someone considers a job in the medical industry, there are different options available for those who do not want to provide hands on patient care or spend years studying. Becoming a Medical Office Assistant allows you to have a rewarding career in a fast-paced environment. As a matter of fact, it is possible to embark on this career within as little as 6 months by attending a program full time.

What Does a Medical Office Assistant Do?

A Medical Office Assistant will perform or support the administrative functions in a physician’s office or medical facility. This can include assistance with billing and insurance, scheduling appointments, answering phones, maintaining records, and general office tasks to help ensure the office runs smoothly. This type of professional does not provide hands on care to patients but does have frequent interactions with patients as well as physicians, nurses, and other types of health care professionals. 

Where Are Medical Office Assistants Employed?

There are several different employment settings that need the services of a Medical Office Assistant. Physician’s offices and hospitals are two of the most common settings. However, you may also find employment with other types of clinics such as dialysis clinics, laboratories, long term care, or skilled nursing facilities, just to name a few. Almost any type of health care setting and agency requires administrative support. 

Perks of the Career

The outlook for growth within the health care sector is above average for almost all occupations, medical office assistants included. Demand for Medical Secretaries and Administrative Assistants is projected to grow 10 percent in the next decade, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. This means finding gainful employment as a Medical Office Assistant will be attainable for those who have the skills and knowledge. Unlike more traditional roles in health care, most medical office assistants do not work nights, weekends, or holidays. This is not to say that some clinics won’t require administrative support on weekends, but there is typically a greater work/life balance.

Is Formal Training Needed? 

Although some employers may offer on-the-job training, this is becoming rare. Many hospitals, clinics and other settings of employment prefer candidates that either have experience or some type of formal training. Simply put, some employers will not even consider your resume if you do not already possess the skills that the position requires. They may not have the time or resources to dedicate to on-the-job training. Candidates will find it difficult to obtain employment without a diploma. 

Benefits of Training

There are several benefits of obtaining professional Medical Office Assistant training. Not only do you have a well-rounded knowledge of your duties as a Medical Office Assistant, but you are educated in anatomy, medical terminology, medical coding, and other medical disciplines that will help you in your career. Receiving Medical Office training allows you to enter your new role with the base knowledge needed. You have already learned the skills and competencies required to act as a professional Medical Office Assistant. Being comfortable with the equipment, duties, and practices of the medical office allows you to have the basic skills and competence needed to be an entry level Medical Office Assistant.

Duration of Medical Office Training

One barrier for many people who wish to start a new career is the time commitment involved. That’s what is so great about medical office assistant training programs. You can become a Medical Office Assistant in as little as 6 months, attending full time. Programs do not require hours of prerequisites and unnecessary courses. Rather, the program focuses on the basic skills that you need to know to be proficient in this role. Training to be a Medical Office Assistant saves you time and money while allowing you to pursue a gainful career. 

What Credentials Are Received from Training?

There are different types of Medical Office Assistant training programs; certificate and diploma programs are the most common. Successful completion of a short duration medical office assistant program awards the individual with a diploma. There is an optional certification through the National Center of Competency, NCCT. Those who have completed formal education are eligible to sit for the certification examination. As with the diploma program, it is an optional benefit that can make your resume more attractive to potential employers.

Final Thoughts

There are many rewarding careers within health care. However, many of these require a lot of time and education. Becoming a medical office assistant is a fast track to a fulfilling career. Whether you want to work in health care without being hands on, are seeking career stability, or want to advance within the role, medical office training can help you achieve your goals. 

Now that you know how long it takes to become a medical office assistant, want to learn more? The Medical Office Assistant Program is designed to prepare graduates to work as an entry-level medical front office assistant, receptionist, insurance biller, insurance collector, appointment scheduler, medical secretary, or medical records clerk in health care centers, clinics, hospitals, ambulatory care centers and medical billing offices. Contact PCI Health Training Center for more information on how to become a medical office assistant and start a rewarding career today. If you are interested in learning how you can start a new career by attending PCI Health Training Center, contact us for more information on how to start a rewarding career today.

 

**PCI firmly upholds its policy of nondiscrimination. Inquiries regarding policy may be directed to TitleIXCoordinator@pcihealth.com.

 

For more information about our graduation rates and other important information, please visit our website at www.pcihealth.edu/consumer-information

Congratulations, High School Graduating Class of 2021

So, we have made it through a tough year of shutdowns and zoom classes, but as the graduating class of 2021, you persevered. You met the challenge head on and overcame. Graduates, your passion and commitment will help you flourish in your newest endeavors to come.

Are you ready to start a new chapter in life? For those of you that are just graduating high school, PCI Health Training Center offers more than a job. We offer a career in Medical Assisting, Dental Assisting, and Medical Office Assisting. With the ever growing medical and dental industries, more opportunities are presenting themselves each and every day. Did you know that the demand for medical assisting is projected to grow 19 percent in the coming decade, and Dental Assisting is projected to grow by 7 percent according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics? With the increase in baby boomers retiring, the demand for additional medical and dental services, and the boom in technology, we are seeing a large demand for support staff at medical and dental facilities.

Graduated High School in 2021?

As a high school graduate in today’s job market, it may be daunting to figure out what you want to do. Do you want to attend a four-year college or maybe you want to find a job? With the influx of talented high school graduates, one of the best ways to compete in this job market is to attend a vocational school. A vocational school allows you to learn to be a Medical or Dental assistant in as little as under a year and prepare for the new job market. Employers are looking for candidates that are trained and ready to start working on day one. A Medical or Dental Assisting program will prepare you with the knowledge and skills you need to get a job in this competitive job market. You will even get hands on experience through lab work and an externship. You will have real world experience that you can put on your resume to show your commitment and determination to learn and grow.

Need Help with Your Job Search?

The best part about attending a vocational school is that we assist you in your job search efforts after completing the Medical, Medical Office, and Dental Assisting programs. Although we can’t guarantee that you will get a specific job, we do prepare you for the job market. Whether it is mock interviews, resume building, or workshops, we help you prepare for your job interview and allow you to network with community organizations. We have ties with the community and will help you get in front of the employers that are looking for entry-level medical and dental assistants.

Benefits of Attending Vocational School

There are many benefits to attending a vocational school. Whether it is graduating in as little as year, gaining the knowledge and skills to start a new career, or benefiting from financial aid and career services, attending a vocational school is a good stepping-stone to a rewarding career in Medical and Dental Assisting.

A Quick Start

Our programs can be completed in as little as 9 months. We even offer a Hybrid Medical Assisting program that allows for a combination of in person and online training. Whether you are interested in Medical Assisting, Medical Office Assisting, or Dental Assisting, you can gain the knowledge and skills you need to start earning quickly.

Industry-Experienced Instructors

PCI Health hires industry-experienced instructors to educate you in Medical and Dental Assisting. These instructors have been in the industry and know what you need to start working an entry-level position at a Physician’s Office, Dentist’s Office, or any other Medical Facility. They prepare curriculum that matches what you will encounter in the real world because they have been in your shoes before, so they understand the challenges of starting a new vocation. They will help you prepare for your new career.

Real World Experience Through Externship

Part of the curriculum of the medical and dental assisting programs involves lab work where you administer diagnostic tests, manage real patients, sit chairside with dentists and doctors, and learn the vocation hands-on. You cap off your program with an externship that allows you to shadow medical and dental professionals and manage patients under strict supervision. Every externship gives you the real-world experience you need to start a new career and gives you a head start on the competition for when you go to apply for an entry-level position.

Financial Aid

For those that qualify, PCI Health has financial aid officers that will assist you in the determining your financial aid assistance availability. They will remind you about the deadlines to file the FAFSA form and educate you on any scholarships, grants, or loans that may be available.

Career Services

It is important to reiterate that you will receive career service assistance to help you find your first job after graduating from PCI Health Training Center. We are committed to helping you find an entry-level position. Offering you interview coaching, resume building, and information regarding job fairs to secure your future in medical or dental assisting.

Final Thoughts

Now that you are about to graduate from high school and start your journey in the job market, it is time to take advantage of the benefits that a vocational school can offer. You learn a new vocation, get real world experience, and gain the confidence to begin your new career. Become a Medical, Medical Office, or Dental Assistant today, and have a happier tomorrow.

Congratulations again to the graduating class of 2021. If you are interested in learning how you can start a new career by attending PCI Health Training Center, contact us for more information on how to start a rewarding career today.

**PCI firmly upholds its policy of nondiscrimination. Inquiries regarding policy may be directed to TitleIXCoordinator@pcihealth.com.

For more information about our graduation rates and other important information, please visit our website at www.pcihealth.edu/consumer-information

Benefits of A Vocational College

Interested in attending a program at a vocational college? There are many benefits to attending a vocational college. Whether you get a quick start or have career services when you graduate, there are many reasons to attend a vocational college.

However, before you make the decision of which vocational college to attend, it’s essential to consider the impact of the decision. All the benefits and options should be evaluated carefully. Try to prioritize what you are looking for, and rate each college accordingly. Do they offer the program you want to study? Will you need financial aid to pay for college? These are some of the questions that you may want to answer before picking a vocational college.

What are the Benefits of Attending a Vocational College?

A vocational college offers you what you need to start an entry-level position after graduation. So, what are the benefits of choosing a vocational college?

Benefit #1: A Quick Start

Don’t want to spend years attending school? At a vocational college, you complete your studies in months rather than years. Whether you need a new career opportunity or just want to change careers, a vocational college can help you become educated in your chosen field and allow you to start earning right in as little as 9 months.

Benefit #2 Prepare for a Career

There are hundreds of excellent four-year colleges around the country. At a four-year college, students learn the general skills they need to enter the workforce when they graduate. While students who graduate from four-year colleges have a degree, they still may be uncertain about the career path on which to embark. Students who attend vocational colleges know what they want to do when they graduate and are prepared to start working in as little as 9 months.

Benefit #3: Learn Only What You Need

At a four-year college you may end up taking a lot of unnecessary electives. At a vocational college, you learn only what you need to begin your new career. As a student, you will learn all the relevant skills you need in less time than you would if you were enrolled in a four-year degree program. When you complete your program, you will be ready for an entry-level career in your chosen field.

Benefit #4: Externships

Most students who attend vocational college are required to take an externship which gives them hands-on experience in the field they’ve chosen. Although it is required, most students enjoy the opportunity to get real world experience for their resume. Why? Because, when they start looking for that new career after graduation, they are already one step ahead of the competition.

During an externship program, you will work in a real lab or workshop setting while being supervised by real industry professionals. You will put your classroom theory to the test with real patients. There is nothing like working in a real-world situation to confirm that the industry is the right career path for you.

Benefit #5: Career Services

Many vocational schools work with employers in their chosen field, which makes the job search easier for graduating students. Vocational colleges network with local employers to build out the curriculum, and in return, they have a pool of trained candidates ready to fill entry-level positions. As a vocational college graduate, you have the inside track to an exciting new career.

Benefit #6: Vocational Colleges are Accredited

Vocational colleges that are accredited have met or exceeded stringent quality standards set forth by the accreditation agency. This helps you make a better choice when you decide to attend a vocational college. Also, a vocational college that is accredited, takes their students education seriously and looks to improve the quality of their academic offerings. All accreditation agencies are interested in giving students the best education they can possibly get and that means they hold the colleges to high standards.

Benefit #7: Financial Aid

For those vocational colleges that are accredited, they are able to offer federal aid to their students. This includes grants, loans, and scholarships that are offered through the FAFSA program, for those that qualify. Your vocational college will help you remember all the deadlines to apply for your financial aid. Talk with the financial aid department counselor for more information about financial aid at your vocational college.

Final Thoughts

Now that you know the benefits of attending a vocational college, it is time to pick your new career. Ready to work in allied health as a dental or medical assistant? At PCI Health Training Center, we offer programs in medical assisting, medical office assisting, and dental assisting. Three careers that are in demand. Students preparing for careers in these professions have an excellent start to a new career. These are among the professions with high job growth rates (www.bls.gov). Start on your path to a new career and begin the next chapter of your new life.

Did learning about the benefits of vocational college interest you? PCI Health Training Center offers programs in medical assisting, dental assisting and medical office assisting. We are a private vocational college committed to preparing students for the Healthcare industry. PCI provides hands-on training and school externships that provide real-world experience and prepare you for the first day at your new career. Contact PCI Health Training Center for more information on how to start a rewarding career today.

**PCI firmly upholds its policy of nondiscrimination. Inquiries regarding policy may be directed to TitleIXCoordinator@pcihealth.com.

For more information about our graduation rates and other important information, please visit our website at www.pcihealth.edu/consumer-information

Why Do Medical Assistants Take Vital Signs?

Vital signs are clinical measurements of the body’s essential functions. These readings help doctors diagnose disease and other medical conditions. Performed by a medical assistant, it’s a routine but critical task that requires technical expertise, skill, and accuracy.

What Are the Different Vital Signs?

The four principal vital signs are temperature, blood pressure, pulse, and respiratory rate. Measures of clinical significance, including height, weight, and peripheral oxygen saturation, aren’t always a part of vital signs in all doctor’s offices; it depends on their specialty. Oxygen saturation is the percentage of oxygen in peripheral tissue and is a more valuable indicator of health as part of a cardiac workup than a gynecological exam.

When Does a Medical Assistant Take Vital Signs?

Medical assistants take vital signs at each visit. Changes in temperature, blood pressure, pulse and respirations can indicate an acute illness, but patterns over time are even more telling. A single elevated blood pressure reading, for example, is rarely clinically significant on its own, but an up or down trend over months could indicate a serious disorder.

How Are Vital Signs Taken?

Medical assistants take vital signs using the latest equipment and these methods:

Temperature

The normal adult body temperature is variable. 98.6 is only an average. The healthy range is between 97 and 99 degrees Fahrenheit. Temperature is measured orally, rectally, tympanic, and on skin.

Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is the force blood exerts on artery walls during a two-part cardiac cycle. Systolic blood pressure, measured when the heart beats, reflects the strength of the muscle. It’s reported “over” the diastolic measurement, which is taken when the heart is relaxed. Together readings paint a picture of the patient’s cardiovascular function.

A medical assistant takes a patient’s BP with a sphygmomanometer, a device that measures the rise and fall of a column of mercury as air is added to, or released from, a cuff wrapped around the upper arm. The medical assistant records results as millimeters of mercury, or “mm Hg.”

Pulse

Arteries vibrate with every heartbeat. Medical assistants measure heart rate, or “pulse,” over the arteries in the wrist, neck or groin by counting the pulsations for 15 seconds and multiplying the result by four.

The rhythm and character of the beats are also noted. Patients with abnormal heart rates or rhythms require special care. Medical assistants use a stethoscope to listen to heartbeats directly because it’s easier to detect abnormalities.

Respiratory Rate

A patient’s respiratory rate is how many breaths they take in 60 seconds, adults average 12–16. Stress and anxiety can cause unexpected changes in how people breathe, so medical assistants count while making chit chat, so patients are unaware.

Height

Medical assistants measure height in inches or centimeters against a vertical surface. Using the same device and a consistent technique at each visit ensures accuracy.

Weight

Medical assistants obtain weight in pounds or kilograms using a standing scale. A few pounds gained or lost can be clinically significant, so precision counts.

Peripheral Oxygen Saturation

Oxygen saturation readings indicate how much hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying substance in blood, is reaching the brain and peripheral tissues. Readings are taken with a pulse oximeter that clamps to the patient’s fingertip. The medical assistant records results as a percentage. 95 to 100 is normal. Cold fingers and dark nail polish may cause abnormally low results.

Why Are Vital Signs Taken

Taking vital signs at every visit gives doctors a wealth of information that serves several important purposes.

It Establishes a Baseline

Changes in a patients’ vital signs can only be detected if they’ve been regularly monitored. Readings vary between individuals, and it’s essential not to make treatment decisions without knowing what’s normal for each patient.

It Can Diagnose Illness and Disease

A change in vital signs is often the first indicator of an acute illness. Specific patterns are recognized as indicative of certain conditions. An elevated temperature, pulse and respiratory rate, for example, may suggest infection.

Doctors use trends over time to diagnose disease. A few high blood pressure readings could be flukes, but if it remains elevated, it reflects hypertension, a primary disorder often rooted in heart or kidney disease. Accurate vital signs tell the doctor what to look for and what steps to take.

It’s Used to Calculate and Adjust Medication Dosages

Many medications are prescribed based on:

Heart Rate – Drugs for abnormal heart rhythms can lower heart rate too much. Patients on these medications are asked to check their pulse daily before taking a dose, adjusting it up or down based on rate.

Blood Pressure – Many people’s blood pressure is too variable for a preset dose of antihypertensive drugs, so instead, physicians prescribe a range of BP-related doses. These patients monitor their readings at home and take more or less medication based on the results.

BMI – Also known as body mass index, this reading is used to calculate dosage for a wide range of medications, from antibiotics to anticoagulants. BMI is a calculation using a patient’s height and weight, so those measurements must be accurate.

Oxygen Saturation – Levels are used to determine if someone needs supplemental oxygen or breathing medications. Dosages can be tricky because many people with respiratory issues also have heart disease, and doses for each condition vary. It’s a balancing act made safer by taking vital signs.

Final Thoughts

Medical assistants perform a broad range of administrative and clinical functions, but among the most meaningful is taking timely, accurate vital signs. These essential measures are a window into a patient’s health and a must for physicians to make sound, therapeutic decisions.

Did learning about taking vital signs interest you? Ready to become a medical assistant? PCI Health Training Center’s Medical Assistant program prepares a graduate to work as an entry-level Medical Assistant. Within this general career category there are several specialty areas, including Medical Administrative Office Assistant, Clinic Assistant, Clinic Tech, Medical Office Manager, Phlebotomist and Physical Therapy Aide in a doctor’s office, clinic or hospital out-patient clinic. Contact PCI Health Training Center for more information on how to become a medical assistant and start a rewarding career today.

**PCI firmly upholds its policy of nondiscrimination. Inquiries regarding policy may be directed to TitleIXCoordinator@pcihealth.com.

For more information about our graduation rates and other important information, please visit our website at www.pcihealth.edu/consumer-information.

Who Becomes a Medical Assistant?

Healthcare is an attractive field. Jobs are plentiful, flexible, and there’s room for professional growth. But providing hands-on care isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. Medical assisting is an ideal career for people who like working with patients but prefer a blend of clinical and administrative responsibilities. You’ll enjoy being a medical assistant if:

You’re Interested in Science and Medicine

If you have an aptitude for science, you’ll appreciate what medical assisting offers. From working with cutting edge technology to exploring the newest in treatments, you’ll have a front-row seat for the most exciting developments in medicine.

During a medical assisting program, you will learn about anatomy, physiology, and phlebotomy. Science is involved in everything you do as a medical assistant.

You’re Passionate About Helping Others

Helping others is part of every profession, but nowhere is it more intimate than in the healthcare field. Working with physically and emotionally vulnerable patients, you’ll have an opportunity to make a meaningful impact in their lives. You will help people from every walk of life. If you wake up in the morning asking yourself how you can make the world a better place, working in the medical field is an excellent place to start.

You Like Working with a Team

Healthcare is a team sport. You’ll never feel alone or unsupported. Colleagues work together on a common mission to provide patients with the highest quality, most comprehensive care possible. Everyone works together. If you thrive on camaraderie and a team-based approach to solving problems, you’ll make a great medical assistant.

As a medical assistant, you will also work with like minded colleagues that care about their patients and want them to have the best outcomes possible. Working with a medical team is supportive, and you will always be able to turn to someone on your team when you need help or just want someone to talk with.

You Prefer to Stay Busy

Healthcare settings are fast paced. Productivity is important because it saves lives. There is also urgent matters that rearrange your schedule each day. If you like to stay busy at work, medical assisting is engaging without being overwhelming.

You Want Your Opinion to Matter

Many employees don’t feel valued at work. They believe managers don’t hear their opinions, and what they contribute to their company’s success is undervalued. However in healthcare, employers realize that each member has a unique connection to patients and therefore, a distinct and valuable point of view.

You Want to Continue to Learn

The learning doesn’t stop once you graduate from the medical assisting diploma program. You have the opportunity to become certified by different organizations like the National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT). To keep this certification, you will be required to take continuing education classes. Everyday also brings new learning. Whether it is a new medical device, treatment, or procedure, there is always something new to learn as a medical assistant.

You Want to Advance in Your Career

Once you become a medical assistant and graduate with a diploma, you can work in a specialized field even with a little experience. Do you like to work with kids, the elderly, or pregnant moms to be? Regardless of the specialty, you will need to get the prerequisite medical assisting diploma before you move on to specialize. You can stay a medical assistant as long as you want. As a physician’s office medical assistant, you get to help a wide variety of people with many different backgrounds. Two days are never alike.

How Do You Become a Medical Assistant?

The best way to become a medical assistant is to get a vocational school diploma. In order to fully understand all of your responsibilities, it is important to get a formal education. Working on the job as a medical assistant may teach you a few skills, but completing a diploma program will give you a full education. Next time you are looking to specialize or move up the ladder, the diploma will come in handy.

Healthcare is complex, and graduates of a medical assisting program are ready for an entry-level role. Courses prepare students to tackle clinical and administrative responsibilities.

Are There Advancement Opportunities for Medical Assistants?

Medical assistants have a wide range of advancement opportunities. Their diverse skill set is welcomed in any healthcare setting. With experience, they can build on their education and move into supervisory positions or entirely different parts of the medical field. A medical assistant who excels in the lab could become a full-time phlebotomist with a little more training, while someone with a talent for finance or human resources could be an office manager.

The key to advancement is education. A diploma plus experience qualifies medical assistants for certification through professional organizations, such as The National Center for Competency Testing (NCCT). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, the nation’s largest insurer, mandates medical assistants be certified to enter orders into electronic health records, so credentials make job applicants more attractive to hire. The more education medical assistants receive, the greater their opportunity to get ahead.

Final Thoughts

Do you have a passion for science and medicine? Want to help others on a daily basis? Then becoming a medical assistant may be the right career path for you. Start a medical assisting diploma program today and start help patients tomorrow.

Are you looking for a good career in healthcare? Ready for an exciting career as a medical assistant? PCI Health Training Center’s Medical Assistant program prepares a graduate to work as an entry-level Medical Assistant. Within this general career category there are several specialty areas, including Medical Administrative Office Assistant, Clinic Assistant, Clinic Tech, Medical Office Manager, Phlebotomist and Physical Therapy Aide in a doctor’s office, clinic or hospital out-patient clinic. Contact PCI Health Training Center for more information on how to become a medical assistant and start a rewarding career today.

**PCI firmly upholds its policy of nondiscrimination. Inquiries regarding policy may be directed to TitleIXCoordinator@pcihealth.com.

For more information about our graduation rates and other important information, please visit our website at www.pcihealth.edu/consumer-information.

How Long is Dental Assistant School?

Happy group of Latin American medical students taking a selfie at school and smiling

Do you want to work in the dental field? Most jobs in dentistry require a college degree, but spending years in the classroom isn’t an option for everyone. Students attending full-time can complete a vocational school dental assisting program in as little as nine months. It’s the fastest way to get out into the field and learn.

What Do You Learn in Dental Assistant School?

Vocational school dental assisting programs cover everything you need to know for an entry-level position at an oral care practice. Courses include:

Anatomy and Physiology

Anatomy and physiology classes cover the body’s 12 systems and how they work together to keep us healthy. Oral and general health are linked. Knowing how the body works helps dental assistants educate patients about dentistry and how it contributes to their well-being. Discussion topics include:

  • Tooth development
  • Nutrition
  • Infection control
  • Gum health
  • Medical conditions affecting the mouth.
  • Dental needs for different age groups

You’ll build on the knowledge gained in later courses.

Chairside Assisting

Four-handed dentistry is the latest trend. It’s a technique in which the dentist and dental assistant work as a team to reduce the time procedures take. Serving as an extra pair of hands, a dental assistant passes instruments, prepares filling materials, and manages air and water suction, so the oral care professional can focus on other tasks. It’s an efficient and ergonomically sound practice.

Radiology

Radiography, or x-rays, are images of the teeth, bone, and nerves below the gum line. It’s a dental assistant’s role to take high-quality images that can diagnose abnormalities from cavities to abscesses. In a radiology course, you’ll learn about different types of x-rays, imaging equipment, patient positioning techniques, and radiation safety.

Office Procedures

Dental assistants manage a wide range of clinical and administrative responsibilities. In a dental assisting program, you’ll learn about the importance of customer service, plus how to:

  • Schedule and coordinate patients
  • Handle referrals
  • Assist with insurance claims

Even if you’ve never worked in an office before, you’ll be introduced to the skills you need to feel comfortable on day one.

Laboratory Procedures

Dental assistants can perform preventive care procedures, such as taking blood pressure, applying fluoride treatments, and coronal polishing. They also help make molds and orthodontic appliances in the laboratory. Each of these skills takes experience to perfect, but you’ll learn the basics from experienced instructors.

The Benefits of Attending Dental Assistant School

Vocational school diploma programs have distinct benefits that include focused training, industry-experienced instructors, flexible learning opportunities, small classes, and support. All of these benefits help you prepare for your dental assisting career in as little as 9 months.

Benefit #1: Focused Training

How can a diploma program teach students the skills they need in less than half the time of a degree program? The answer is simple; the curriculum focuses on practical skills. The elective courses required by universities are never a waste because they enhance the learning experience, but they’re costly and unnecessary for success on the job. Continuing education after graduation offers similar enrichment benefits without delaying students’ ability to earn a paycheck.

Benefit #2: Industry-experienced Instructors

Dental assisting is hands-on work, and skills are best learned from instructors with experience in the field. Vocational schools hire well-educated, seasoned instructors with real-world dental experience. That’s important at a time when technology continually progresses at rapid rates.

Benefit #3: Small Classes

Students tend to learn better in small classrooms. Instead of being a nameless student in a lecture hall, attend a program where you will receive personalized attention from instructors and get support from peers. The atmosphere in a vocational school is relaxed and creative because students have the time to share insights. Plus, a struggling student rarely falls behind because instruction is more personal.

Benefit #4: Vocational Support

No one takes jobs more seriously than vocational schools. It’s their mission not only to educate but also to assist that graduates find relevant work. They partner with local dentists to understand the skills students need from dental assistants to help tailor their curriculum to teach those skills. These practices then turn to schools to meet their staffing needs. It’s a win-win.

How Important is Getting a Dental Assisting Diploma?

As we learn more about the importance of oral health, dentistry is becoming more complex. Dentists are ultimately responsible for the competency of their staff, so they prefer to hire well-trained applicants with proven skills. A vocational school diploma stands out on a resume and gives graduates an edge in a competitive field. Why settle for any position when you can qualify for your dream job?

 

Final Thoughts

Education is an investment, but the time it takes to complete training matters. Now that you know how long it takes to complete dental assistant school, it is time to invest in yourself. If you have a passion for dentistry, a fulfilling career you can be proud of is in just as little as nine months away.

Want to start a career helping others? Deciding whether you want to become a dental assistant? The Dental Assistant Program prepares a graduate to work as an entry-level Dental Assistant, Dental Receptionist, Office Manager or Dental Hygienist Assistant in a dental office, specialty practice, or dental clinic. PCI Health Training Center Richardson, TX Campus offers a dental assistant program. Contact PCI Health Training Center for more information on how to become a dental assistant and start a rewarding career today.

 

**PCI firmly upholds its policy of nondiscrimination. Inquiries regarding policy may be directed to TitleIXCoordinator@pcihealth.com.

For more information about our graduation rates and other important information, please visit our website at www.pcihealth.edu/consumer-information. The Dental Assistant Program is offered at our Richardson Campus.

 

How Long Does It Take to Become Certified as a Medical Assistant?

Medical Assistants

Want a job that is gratifying and challenging? Did you know that it takes as little as nine months to become a medical assistant? You can get educated and certified in under a year and start earning as an entry-level medical assistant. So, are you asking yourself, “What does a medical assistant do?”

What Does a Medical Assistant Do?

Medical assistants are responsible for both administrative and clinical tasks. They greet, escort, and talk with patients. Medical assistants are the patient’s liaison between the waiting room up and when they leave the medical office. The medical assistant works closely with doctors and nurses, ensuring that patients have a positive experience. A medical assistant’s responsibilities may include:

  • Overseeing the schedule of the doctor and office
  • Triaging phone calls as needed
  • Greeting and escorting patients to exam rooms
  • Taking vital signs and reviewing medical histories
  • Collecting lab specimens including blood
  • Administering vaccinations
  • Performing diagnostic tests like EKG
  • Sterilizing instruments and surfaces between patients
  • Managing medical records

How Do You Become a Certified Medical Assistant?

The first step in becoming a certified medical assistant is by graduating from a medical assisting program at a vocational school. A medical assistant program will teach you what you need to know to start working at a physician’s office, medical clinic, or any other medical facility. In the classroom you learn front office skills, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, first aid, and CPR. During lab work, you learn about phlebotomy, EKGs, and many other clinical tasks that you will perform as a certified medical assistant.

The next step involves passing a certification exam from a select number of medical assistant associations. Passing these exams and becoming certified will help you find your first job as a medical assistant and when you are interested in moving up to a more senior level position.

Why Choose a Career as a Medical Assistant?

Careers in medical assisting have many benefits, such as short training programs, a positive work-life balance, flexibility, a supportive environment, and an opportunity to learn. With this information, you can make a better decision whether or not to become a certified medical assistant.

Short Training Programs

In as little as nine months, you can become a certified medical assistant. Most vocational schools focus on what you will need to work as a medical assistant. They prepare you for your first day at work. Much of the learning happens in the lab while being supervised by industry-experienced instructors. This program prepares you for your first day and gives you the confidence to walk into the door of your new job and hit the ground running.

A Positive Work-Life Balance

Most physician offices are open during normal business hours and is when most medical assistant shifts occur. This gives you time to have a life outside of work to exercise, visit with family, take up a hobby, etc. A positive work-life balance is important, so you don’t burn out at your job. Becoming a certified medical assistant may give you that balance.

A Supportive Environment

As a medical assistant, you will work with colleagues that care as much about their patients as you do. Everyone in a medical facility has their job to do, but there is always someone available to support you. A medical staff works as a team. Everyone is needed to give patients a positive outcome.

Opportunity to Learn

Part of being a medical assistant involves learning new equipment and procedures. There is always something new to learn. The medical industry moves fast, and there are new technologies being introduced to physician’s offices all the time, new vaccines, new ways to test a patient’s heart, and more. If you like to learn then becoming a certified medical assistant may be the right career for you.

Final Thoughts

Now that you know how long it takes to become a certified medical assistant, it is time to start the journey. Helping others is gratifying, and having a supportive environment makes work a great place to be, especially if it allows you to enjoy life outside of work, too. If you have a passion for medicine and a true desire to help others, then becoming a certified medical assistant may be the right career path for you. Get ready to start a career you will enjoy for years to come.

Are you looking for a good career in healthcare? Ready for an exciting career as a certified medical assistant? PCI Health Training Center’s Medical Assistant program prepares a graduate to work as an entry-level Medical Assistant. Within this general career category there are several specialty areas, including Medical Administrative Office Assistant, Clinic Assistant, Clinic Tech, Medical Office Manager, Phlebotomist and Physical Therapy Aide in a doctor’s office, clinic or hospital out-patient clinic. Contact PCI Health Training Center for more information on how to become a medical assistant and start a rewarding career today.

**PCI firmly upholds its policy of nondiscrimination. Inquiries regarding policy may be directed to TitleIXCoordinator@pcihealth.com.

For more information about our graduation rates and other important information, please visit our website at www.pcihealth.edu/consumer-information.

What Does a Dental Assistant Do on a Daily Basis?

Medical Assistants

Becoming a dental assistant is an exciting, fast-paced career choice as you become a valued member of a dental team with comprehensive and varied duties. The duties performed daily by a dental assistant range from state to state and include patient check-in and x-rays, to very entailed procedures including child prophylaxis (cleaning and polishing a child’s temporary or transitional dentition) and seating temporary crowns.

Different Types of Dental Focuses

Different dental offices require their dental assistants to possess specific qualifications, Depending upon their focus, like orthodontics, general dentistry, oral pathology or oral surgery, endodontics, pediatric dentistry, prosthodontics, and periodontics. Each of these seven dental specialties performs very distinct functions:

Orthodontics – An orthodontist specializes in the teeth and jaw’s alignment, utilizing braces, wires, retainers, and other implements.

General Dentistry – General dentistry deals with routine dental exams, teeth cleanings, preventative dentistry, and patient referrals to other specialty dentists if services and procedures do not fall under their field of expertise.

Oral Pathology/Surgery – Oral pathology or oral surgery is a specialty that includes treating teeth and jaw diseases and, at times, work closely with ENT’s (ear, nose, and throat specialists) in instances that require both dental focuses present.

Endodontics – refers to working expressly with issues where the teeth’ nerves are concerned. They are qualified to perform root canals necessary where there is decay surrounding the tooth’s nerve.

Pediatric Dentistry– specializes in transitional/temporary and early permanent dentition care and treatments for children, youth, and early teens.

Prosthodontics – includes repairing the teeth and the jawbone, cosmetic dentistry, or treatments to improve teeth’ appearance as teeth whitening, veneers, dentures, crowns, and bridges.

Periodontics – treating and repairing the gums’ diseases, including the damaged tissue caused.

Requirements to Become A Dental Assistant

There are several paths to becoming a career dental assistant, depending on the state. Most states require a dental assistant to attend an accredited dental assisting program. Accredited programs offered through technical or vocational schools are the best way to prepare for a dental assisting career. Some states require dental assistants to complete a set amount of externship hours, be licensed, registered, or certified.

A Dental Assistant’s Duties

Dental assistants typically spend their day working with dentists as their right hand, passing instruments and materials to the dentist, suctioning saliva, and holding the dental curing light. During the check-in and appointment preparation time, a dental assistant also acts as a patient’s support system by explaining procedures before the dentist takes a seat with the patient. Most dental assistants take x-rays of teeth, process them, and present them to the dentist.

Under the dentist’s supervision, the dental assistant performs lab tasks, including taking impressions. Depending upon the state regulations, a dental assistant performs duties like seating temporary crowns, performing coronal polishes, and applying fluoride, sealants, or topical anesthetics. Typically, a dental assistant’s day includes some front office duties that encompass keeping records of dental treatments, scheduling patient appointments, and working with patients on billing and payment. Finally, if the dental office you work at doesn’t have a set person to sterilize instruments as some larger practices do, then this task falls to the dental assistant as well.

Instruments A Dental Assistant Should Know

Dental assistants must develop an understanding of dental tools. They are responsible for preparing instruments before an exam or procedure and often hand instruments to the dentist.

Here’s an overview of some of commonly used dental instruments:

Mouth Mirror – a device used to retract the lips, cheeks, and tongue or redirect light into the mouth.

Explorers – this device is used to examine teeth for decay, calculus, furcations, and other abnormalities.

Cotton Forceps – utilized in transferring materials in or out of the oral cavity but is most commonly used to grip cotton.

Periodontal Probe– measures the periodontal pocket depth in millimeter increments.

Periodontal Scalers/Curettes – these instruments come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Utilized in removing tartar from the tooth’s surface with its long, narrow tips. Scalers work to remove tartar from above the gum line, and curettes work below the gum line.

Ultrasonic Scaler – a tartar removal tool that creates vibrations that reverberate outside the normal human hearing range.

Extracting Forceps – this instrument is used for the removal of teeth.

Dental Elevator – lifts teeth in their sockets before extraction to prevent trauma to the mouth’s surrounding tissue and other dentition.

Air Water Syringe – this instrument allows a dental assistant to inject air and water into the mouth to rinse away excess materials then dry the oral cavity.

Saliva Ejector – removes excess saliva or water from the oral cavity during dental procedures by sucking out or ejecting the saliva from the mouth.

Burnishers – a rotary tool, that removes scratches and smooths out rough edges after dental restorations.

Dental Drills – used to cut into tooth enamel to remove tooth decay, utilizing various size and shape bits known as burs.

Excavators – these hand instruments, used to cut into teeth and remove the decayed material, come in several types of dental excavators.

Final Thoughts

The growth in dental assisting shows a link to oral health and preventive dental care. The dental career field is expected to increase in demand as dental practices hire dental assistants to complete routine tasks, allowing dentists and hygienists to work more efficiently. After working in that field, some dental assistants further their education and become hygienists, typically an associate’s program. Start a career today that will still be exciting tomorrow.

Want to start a career that is in demand? Deciding whether you want to become a dental assistant? The Dental Assistant Program prepares a graduate to work as an entry-level Dental Assistant, Dental Receptionist, Office Manager or Dental Hygienist Assistant in a dental office, specialty practice, or dental clinic. PCI Health Training Center Richardson, TX Campus offers a dental assistant program. Contact PCI Health Training Center for more information on how to become a dental assistant and start a rewarding career today.

**PCI firmly upholds its policy of nondiscrimination. Inquiries regarding policy may be directed to TitleIXCoordinator@pcihealth.com.

For more information about our graduation rates and other important information, please visit our website at www.pcihealth.edu/consumer-information. The Dental Assistant Program is offered at our Richardson Campus.